Art and Science

unnamedRed Raper and I produced an artist daughter, Linda Carlene Raper. L. Carlene presented me with the poster pictured. It is a photo of a work of art she surprised me with on my 49th birthday in 1974, when I was working with Red on the sex life of Agaricus bisporus.
Campbell Soup Company had provided a grant for Red and me to find out whether or not the mushroom used in their famous mushroom soup could be improved by breeding. Pleased, proud, and amused, we posted said poster on our laboratory wall at Harvard . Two days later, the poster went missing. Oh No! I promptly fixed a note to that blank spot:  “Whosoever took this work of art, please return it. It cannot possibly mean more to you than it does to me.” The thief never responded. What you see above is a photo taken the day of hanging.
As for the research project depicted, we found out that that mushroom does have a sex life, but all it does is fertilize itself–what good is that, I ask, if you can’t mix different genomes from different places? Well, using fancy molecular techniques, the system can be manipulated to cross breed, but not easily. Such research continues in other labs.
I had thought that Andy Warhol-like image was gone forever, but L. Carlene surprised me on my recent ninetieth birthday by digging its photo out of the archives and mounting it on a 2×3 foot poster board. It hangs in my hallway today.
Art meets science again.
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